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History Manor Houses of the Isle of Wight

Whitefield Manor

REF NR: 371

"WHITEFIELD (Witesfel, xi cent.; Whytefeld, xiii cent.) is the principal manor in the parish, of which it forms the north-west angle. There are two entries in Domesday referring to Whitefield, then in the possession of William son of Stur. The first, held of him by Rainald, had a saltern and was worth 20s.; the second, held by him in person, was of considerable value, having three mills and being worth £7. Both had been held as alods of King Edward, the first by Chetel, the second by Godric. The overlordship of the manor remained with the owners of Gatcombe, the descendants of William son of Stur, until the end of the 13th century.

 

"The manor early gave name to a family and was granted in 1158 by Hugh de Witvil or Wyvill to the abbey of Quarr, with whom it remained till John de Witvil disseised the monks at the end of the 12th century. In 1333–4 the Abbot of Quarr ineffectually sued the king for this manor. In the 13th century Whitefield came into the possession of the Tracy family and was sold in 1279 by Joan wife of William de Tracy to John de Hardington. John, who died in 1292–3, had demised the manor for the term of his life to the king, who seems to have entered on possession of the manor after John's death, presumably in default of heirs. In 1302 he granted it, among other lands, for the support of his daughter Mary, who had taken the veil at Amesbury. The manor was granted in 1312 to Prince Edward, but Mary probably drew its revenues till her death about 1332, when it reverted to the Crown. It remained a Crown possession subject to numerous grants and leases until 1628, when it was given by Charles I as security for his debts to the City of London, and sold by the trustees in 1630 to John Oglander of Nunwell. The manor has since descended with Nunwell and is now the property of Mr. J. H. Oglander."

- Source: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=42066&strquery=manor#s3


Further local information is needed on this manor, so please get in touch if you can help.

 

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